EB-5 Commentary

EB-5 Regional Center Application Approval Times

Posted by Phil Cohen on Tue, Nov 24, 2015 @ 07:17 AM

One of the most common questions EB-5 professionals are asked from those thinking about starting an EB-5 regional center is, "How long will it take to get approved?"

The answer to this question is multi-layered.  The actual time it takes for USCIS to process an EB-5 regional center application is constantly changing.  Officially, the last-posted processing time on the USCIS website was as follows (I-924 is the official name for an initial regional center application package):

EB-5 Processing Times    Source: USCIS

What people really want to know, however, is how long it takes to get money in the door. There are several things to consider in order to get the real answer here:

  1. Do you have your team together?  This is a critical first step; it is important to understand who you need and how to choose your team.  This step should not be rushed.
  2. Do you have all the answers that your team will need?  Do you know what those things are?  Save yourself a ton of time and expense by finding good resource to help you understand what you'll need to get started.  This information goes beyond a normal start-up's requirements and waiting until you have your (often expensive) team together means that you will quickly come to rely on them for guidance on things that you might have easily discovered on your own at far less expense with a good resource.
  3. Is your deal good or great?  Talk to marketers early on to understand what will make a deal stand out in today's market.  Good deals can sell; great deals will sell faster.
  4. From there the package needs to be assembled and your team of experts need to do their thing.  Depending on your EB-5 regional center's complexity, expect anywhere from 1 to 2 months on average to get your package assembled and ready for submission.  Most experts will tell you that the clients take much longer.
  5. Once your package is submitted you can start marketing.  How will you market to foreign investors?  How big is your raise?  How saleable is your deal? The answers to these questions will have an impact on how quickly you can get the capital you are seeking.
  6. Once you win investors, each investor must submit their own petition to have themselves approved as an EB-5 investor.  This adds several months to the process (for each investor).
------------

Phil Cohen is the founder and President of Strategic Element, a company that focuses on developing regional centers, EB-5 business plans, economic impact reports, feasibility studies and custom 'direct' EB-5 projects for its clients (www.strategicelementconsulting.com). 

 

Tags: EB-5 center I-924, EB-5 Team, I-526, EB-5 Regional center processing times, I-924, EB-5 Regional Center, job creation

On Using Borrowed Funds to Invest in EB-5 Projects

Posted by Phil Cohen on Mon, Nov 16, 2015 @ 05:59 AM

 

It is important to note that when an EB-5 investor uses borrowed funds, for example, from a home equity loan or from a company equity loan to invest in an EB-5 project, USCIS will likely ask for proof that the EB-5 investor can repay this loan.

For many investors, this may be easily achievable, yet for others it may not be so easy, which could be in part why they needed to borrow the funds in the first place.

An example of when this type of scenario can work occurs when an investor uses a home equity loan of $500,000 to attain the funds needed for the EB-5 investment.  If however, the investor's total debt on the home is, for example, $1 million on a $5 million home (after borrowing against the home to make the EB-5 investment), the investor could easily argue that they could liquidate the home and repay the loan.

It is a great advantage to investors to be able to use borrowed funds in this way, but all parties should be wary of the pitfalls in doing so.  For regional centers, investors' ability to pay back the loan should be vetted before the investor's I-526 is submitted, and assurances in writing should be asked from the investor to demonstrate that the status of their loan or their ability to pay it back will not change any time soon.

 

------------

Phil Cohen is the founder and President of Strategic Element, a company that focuses on developing regional centers, EB-5 business plans, economic impact reports, feasibility studies and custom 'direct' EB-5 projects for its clients (www.strategicelementconsulting.com). 

 

 

Download Your Free Paper:  9 Things to Know  Before Going Down  The EB-5 Road

Tags: EB5 Regional center, EB-5 investors, I-526, EB-5, EB-5 Regional Center, EB5

A Reminder About Industry and Geographic Restrictions and Amendments

Posted by Phil Cohen on Wed, Nov 11, 2015 @ 01:33 PM

Here is a reminder regarding amendments, which is worth noting...

In its EB-5 Policy Memorandum of May 30, 2013, USCIS put forward an important change to this requirement. Therefore, when an EB-5 regional center wishes to expand its industry codes, it may now do so with an investor's I-526 submission.  As a result, the formal amendment process (and the very significant wait time that it used to imply) is no longer required as a separate action by the regional center.  The result is a considerably higher degree of flexibility afforded to regional centers who may wish to expand their geographic or industry sphere of focus.

There is, however, still value, however, to the formal amendment process.  The main value is that investors can be more certain of the approval of the new areas of focus when a regional center has received approval of a formal amendment in advance of the investor submitting their I-526.

Ultimately, for the regional center, it is a judgment call whereby the 'saleability’ of a deal would need to be traded off against the delays involved in seeking a formal amendment.

USCIS has also provided some indication (although this appears not to be definitive in how it was presented) that a regional center’s geographic area of focus may also be expanded via an investor's I-526 petition.  In order to do so the geographic area must be contiguous with the existing regional center boundaries and would require a justification for expansion to the new boundaries.  Similar to what has been described above for expansion of industries of focus, investors will be taking a risk that the justification provided will be accepted by USCIS.

------------

Phil Cohen is the founder and President of Strategic Element, a company that focuses on developing regional centers, EB-5 business plans, economic impact reports, feasibility studies and custom 'direct' EB-5 projects for its clients (www.strategicelementconsulting.com). 

 

 

Tags: amendment application, EB5 Regional center, EB-5 explained, I-526, EB-5 Business plan

Heard About Flexible Adjudication to Save Time on EB-5 Projects?

Posted by Phil Cohen on Thu, Nov 05, 2015 @ 02:47 PM

As readers of this blog are likely aware by now, the rules flexible resized 600
and processes involved in the development of an EB-5 regional center application are relatively complex and often subject to interpretation by the lawyers involved and also by the adjudicators. 

As a result, in anything but the most straightforward of cases, an issue often arises around whether the question has been properly answered or whether certain rules apply in particular ways or in particular unusual circumstances.

When facing these kinds of unknowns, developers of EB-5 regional centers and EB-5 projects are often in the position of putting their best foot forward and hoping for the best when it comes to the adjudication of their I-924 application (or the project plan itself).  In these circumstances some project or regional center founders might find themselves in a dilemma in terms of whether to submit their business plans as "hypothetical" or as "actual”/"exemplar" plans.  The reason for the dilemma is that a hypothetical plan requires less detail to be approved but if one can have their plan approved as an exemplar plan then they can benefit from deference to this approval when their investors submit their I-526 petitions.

When unsure, there is the possibility of trying to get the maximum benefit of an exemplar approval without losing time should USCIS determine that there is insufficient information to approve the plan as an actual/exemplar.  The way to go about this is to make a written request when the project is being submitted that the plan be adjudicated as an actual/exemplar, but if this is not possible to adjudicate the plan as a hypothetical.

In most cases, this will not hold up the process and allow the entrepreneur to move ahead with the project as quickly as possible should they not be able to get actual/exemplar approval right away.  Saving the step of a re-submission can also save some of the costs involved in doing so.

------------

Phil Cohen is the founder and President of Strategic Element, a company that focuses on developing regional centers, EB-5 business plans, economic impact reports, feasibility studies and custom 'direct' EB-5 projects for its clients (www.strategicelementconsulting.com). 

 

 

Download Your Free Paper:  9 Things to Know  Before Going Down  The EB-5 Road

Tags: EB-5 center I-924, EB5 Regional center, EB-5 Project, EB-5 explained, EB-5 investors, I-526, applications, EB-5 regional centers, I-924, EB-5, EB-5 Regional Center